March/April Wildflowers on the C&O Canal Between Mile Markers 71 and 72

Star of Bethlehem.  This plant is highly invasive and--at the moment--outnumbers the dreaded garlic mustard on this section of the towpath.

Star of Bethlehem. This plant is highly invasive and–at the moment–outnumbers the dreaded garlic mustard on this section of the towpath.

This plant is also prevalent along the canal.  It has been around for a number of weeks, and I've noticed it (as a weed) in many yards in our hometown of Martinsburg, WV.

This plant (purple dead nettle) ┬áis also prevalent along the canal. It has been around for a number of weeks, and I’ve noticed it (as a weed) in many yards in our hometown of Martinsburg, WV.

Dutchman's breeches have been around for several weeks and occupy many large patches along the canal and river.

Dutchman’s breeches have been around for several weeks and occupy many large patches along the canal and river.

Blood root grew more sporadically in this area and is already gone.  After a recent hard wind, petals from this flower were scattered.

Blood root grew more sporadically in this area and is already gone. After a recent hard wind, petals from this flower were scattered.

Trout lilies have been around for a bit over a week.  There are several patches of their "mottled" leaves in the area, but the immature single-leaved plants don't  produce a flower.  The mature plants with double leafs produce this interesting looking specimen.

Trout lilies have been around for a bit over a week. There are several patches of their “mottled” leaves in the area, but the immature single-leaf plants don’t produce a flower. The mature plants with double leaves produce this interesting looking specimen.

Virginia bluebells are generally blue, but we did see a single cluster with white flowers.

Virginia bluebells are generally blue, but we did see a single cluster with white flowers.

Bluebells in their more traditional color

Bluebells in their more traditional color

Violets

Violets

Cut-leaf toothwort.  They are fading fast!

Cut-leaf toothwort. They are fading fast!

Golden ragwort

Golden ragwort

White violet

White violet

The grape hyacinth was plentiful early on, but they are going, going, almost gone.

The grape hyacinth was plentiful early on, but they are going, going, almost gone.

Ground ivy

Ground ivy

Garlic mustard is the most-hated invasive plant along the towpath.

Garlic mustard is the most-hated invasive plant along the towpath.

Spring beauties

Spring beauties

And then there's the dandelion.  You would like to forget about it, but it won't let you!

And then there’s the dandelion. You would like to forget about it, but it won’t let you!

 

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5 responses to this post.

  1. Posted by Jamie on April 14, 2016 at 8:39 am

    Enjoyed the pictures — especially those white “bluebells”. Purple dead nettle seems to be especially abundant this spring in our neck of the woods. I have seen several large patches of it along the road — we even have a small carpet of it in our as-of-yet-untilled garden.

    Reply

    • Posted by LevelWalker on April 14, 2016 at 11:44 pm

      The dead nettles were plentiful. It’s worth noting that many people would find the Star of Bethlehem and garlic mustard alarming. In many places, they are taking over at the expense of native plants.

      Reply

  2. Posted by Debbie on April 15, 2016 at 6:01 am

    Great photographs of the beautiful wildflowers. I recently learned the names of all of the above, and how to identify them, so it’s nice to see them again these pictures. Keep up the good work on your website!

    Reply

  3. Posted by Michael Strausbauch on April 17, 2017 at 5:46 pm

    Very nice white bluebells… I look for them in our part of the country every year, supposed to be 1:10,000 or one heck of a lot of looking at blue bluebells!

    Reply

    • Posted by LevelWalker on April 17, 2017 at 11:55 pm

      That’s very cool information. There was only one small cluster that I noticed below Lock 38 this year. It’s definitely a result of one heck of a lot of looking at blue bluebells.

      Reply

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